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Search Results 0 to 33 of about 34 (some duplicates have been removed)
a quick summary of the laws. the ada, calif. building code, the civil rights, and our experts here will elaborate. we also have a list of certified caps at work in san francisco for you. carla johnson with the mayor's office of disability has created a really good it died of out to interview your experts to make sure you are getting the best quality product for you. been next -- the money you pay for the inspection you can take as a tax deduction. any money that if you have taken can be applied as a tax deduction. this can be done on an annual basis. next, the opportunity, and a fund -- opportunity loan fund, providing for small businesses to pay for the inspection or to make improvements needed. to do it before you receive the lawsuit. and lastly, we of the bar association and their resources. they're providing their legal service for you. this last thing i am going to share with you in terms of what we have seen in our office is that with the individuals, that does not necessarily mean an individual will follow up with a lawsuit. what we've seen in our office is the individual's
a course on the civil rights movement. i went to selma to montgomery to atlanta. in atlanta, we met king's father, dr. abernathy, jose williams yes >> did you ever think you would come back to the bay area? >> yes. [ laughter ]. >> alabama was wonderful, its with one of tremendous growth and understanding. it was one that in many ways was -- set a very -- it was shocking in some ways because it was still very, very racist in many ways from the standpoint of when i first went there looking to buy a car. we were boy. boy. >> that was in '72. >> 1972. there were those kinds of things that i had to get used to and, in fact, so did my friends in alabama. they said meeks you have to know the way it is here and don't react. >> dr. thurman grew up in florida. >> yes. >> and i imagine that kind of experience, you were aware of. i was aware of that what i did not expect, i think in '74, '75. pause i taught that course on black religion, we went to black churches so that students could experience black religion. one day, i saw a sign and heard about the fact that there was this white church having
with the actual history of civil rights in america. and it was great because they believe everything the new york times believes. at least the girls on the view would argue with me. one sentence summary of my book, and don't make the same mistake america. liberals have been the primary practitioners 7. every police shooting, suddenly the klan had taken of the new york city police force. like the trade on martin case, they disappear once the facts come out. the story we were hysterical about, you would know -- the black kid was -- did ambush and killing a cop, only because the stories would disappear from the news. one of the best ones was michael stewart who came to be called an artist because he was caught spraying graffiti in the subway. a dozen cops, they got him to the hospital two weeks later and he passed out and the revived demand and he was at a coma and died of pneumonia. he died as a result of police brutality despite medical examiner's saying the opposite. the cops are put on trial for manslaughter. they are acquitted and the new york times editorial the next day was remembering michae
of them before i left. will i realize people who familiar with the actual history of civil rights in america who read my book notice that they haven't read the book but that was great because they believe everything "the new york times" believes that "the new york times" doesn't argue with me. at least the gals on the few would argue with me. the one sentence summary of my book is, white skills have never produced anything good and don't make the same mistake again america. that is why it hasn't come out before the election. hits a book about racism and to my critics chagrin i am against it. [laughter] liberals have been the primary practitioners of it and i start with the golden age of racial demagoguery in the 70's and 80s when every police shooting of a black kid would be the next mattel case and that is how what was treated in the media. suddenly the klan has taken over new york city police force. there are vignettes of various race hoaxes and much like the trayvon martin case, they all just disappear once the facts came out. you would never guess that this final article. atte
of mississippi," the book previous to this, a study of the civil rights south and integration of james meredith at the university of ol miss. i like to pick out subjects that i feel have a lot on like to pick out these subjects that i feel have a lot of resonance to our cultural history, biography. >> paul hendrickson's most recent work, hemingway's bonet is the name of the book. thank you for joining us on booktv. >> thank you for having me. >> sander and stuart taylor talk about affirmative action, oral arguments in fisher versus university of texas. they agreed with the initial goals of affirmative action. that now believe it hurts the minorities. this is about an hour and a half. >> thank you very much. thank you for roger and cato for sponsoring this event, it is great to have such a great kickoff to the book which is being officially published today. i am going to start and talk a little bit about the central idea itself and some of what we found in the book. i will try to relate this more to what is happening tomorrow. i am particularly glad to be doing this at cato because it stood for
-- many of us congratulate ourselves on the movement of the 60's and we should. the civil rights movement was the greatest movement of my lifetime. feminism is why i am standing here. we were right to stop the vietnam war and we did the right thing. but the 60's were not an unbroken narrative of victory and happiness. they were kind of scary for a lot of people and not just white people. the crime did rise. there were urban riots, the fringe of the entire white movement got violent. divorce rates climbed. there was this sense the country was unraveling. and one of the things i think happened is the democrats were in charge. the democrats were engaged in the great society and the new round of government activism and so because they were in charge when these things seemed to fall apart they got blamed a lot of people i think blame the wrong things for the way the society seemed to fall apart. we were beginning to see offshore the industrialization. people didn't realize it but the blue collar jobs were going away so you have a constituency of people that then became republicans. the governm
? he said i oppose a federal open housing law and this year i support the 1968 civil rights bill with open housing. which way will he blow next? chris: flip-flop ads were used by the two president bushes starting here with george bush 41 slamming bill clinton in 199 and then george w. bush's famous 2004 wind surfing ad against john kerry. >> presidential candidate on the left stood for military action in the persian gulf while the candidate on the right agreed with those who opposed it. one of these candidates is bill clinton. unfortunately, so is the other. in which direction would john kerry lead? kerry voted for the iraq war. opposed it. supported it. and now opposes it again. john kerry. whichever way the wind blows. chris: funny thing is the guy who made that wind surfing ad that's bush's advisor mark mckinnon worked also for john mccain in 2008. and here's the recycled hand he work for mccain against primary opponent mitt romney. >> mitt romney seems to change positions like the wind. he tells florida he supports the bush tax cuts. but as massachusetts governor romney refus
was a student body president there and a college quarterback. he got his start as a civil rights leader there. he was talking to students and reminding them of the sacrifices that their parents and grandparents made when the civil rights movements happened. in durham, he led a march of students to register to vote. they have sunday registration here in north carolina and early registration period there is a two-week period where you can actually vote. there is a two-week window where you can vote. later in the day, we had alicia keys, the singer and songwriter, who had about 1000 people in raleigh at a park edit for atomic late african-american neighborhood and was urging people to vote. in a suburb of raleigh, smithfield, in a tobacco warehouse which is a schumann this warehouse, we had about 5000 people show up to here pat mccrory, the republican for governor and chris christie. this is his third trip to the state. he has campaigned so often, he says he is thinking of moving here. he has campaigned for the republican ticket. host: i'm sure they would miss the governor dearly if he were to l
, congressmen, hip hop and gospel artists as well as civil rights activists have come together over the past few hours to get voters to the polls. just a short time ago i talked to a number of folks who have gathered here, nine days before election day. i asked them why they think this thing is going to be so close. >> i think the election here in florida is going to be one of these bush-gore deals. i look for it to be -- >> you're thinking recount? >> i don't know about recount, but -- >> we hope it's about more than 537. >> yes, yes. >> thank you. >> we'll get back to politics in a moment. right now, though, we turn to the latest on hurricane sandy and for that, we've got it all covered here. nbc meteorologist dylan dreyer with the forecast and white house correspondent mike viquiera standing by with the latest on the president who just got a briefing at fema headquarters. and nbc's thanh truong is on the beach in rehoboth, did he dext let's start with dylan dreyer with the latest advisory from the national hurricane center. what can you tell us? >> we do still have to deal with a category 1 h
out of that civil rights movement era. she was talking about that no tired message. we can stand in those lines. you give us one day, we'll at that time one day. you give us voter i.d., we'll get an i.d. and i think that message is important. >> thank you to joy reid. and up next, i'll bring my panel back in on this issue of voter suppression and the backlash against it. could it turn out that the republicans have been their own great undoing. er ] take dayquil... [ ding! ] ...and spend time on the slopes. take alka-seltzer plus cold & cough... [ buzz! ] ...and spend time on the chair. for non-drowsy 6-symptom cold & flu relief. take dayquil. use nyquil... [ ding! ] ...and get longer nighttime cough relief. use alka-seltzer plus night cold & flu... [ coughs ] [ buzz! ] [ screams ] ...and you could find yourself... honey? ...on the couch. nyquil. 50% longer cough relief. that make kids happy. and even fewer that make moms happy too. with wholesome noodles and bite sized chicken, nothing brings you together like chicken noodle soup from campbell's. it's amazing what soup can do. [
. veronica from the civil rights commission who is here today can answer any technical questions, worked closely with general manager carl kelly. and the advisory committee to develop these changes. and, so, we hope that you will endorse them and again, veronica is here to answer any additional questions you might have. >> i would like some public comment. lisa [speaker not understood]. >> i'm glad you guys can see me. good morning, commissioners. my name is lisa [speaker not understood]. i am the chair for the sfpuc small permit advisory committee. and i'd like to thank you today for this opportunity to be able to speak to you. anyways, we are in favor of endorsing these changes and we hope that you would also see fit to do the same thing. you guys have done a great job in creating opportunities for contractors out there, the larger and the smaller contractors. myself, i'm going to kind of wear two hats here. i'm also a field representative with the carpenters union, carpenters local 152 in manteca in which i cover seven counties. and through this we've had opportunities for our members
in their business department. i was very active in the civil rights movement in new orleans. i moved to san francisco in 1980 with my wife cheryl and our son scott because i bought a seat on the pacific stock exchange in order to trade options for my own account. i did that successfully until 1980 at which time i became an arbitrator for finish ra, the financial industry regulatory authority. i'm still an arbitrator for finra. i also taught as an adjunct professor at usf. i taught real estate in their finance department. when i stopped trading i became more deeply involved in that district. i was elected to the st. stevens school board and was also appointed to the board of directors at the stones town ymca. i coached youth sports at the y and i also fund raised for both organizations. later fund raised for sacred heart where my son went to school and st. ignatius where my daughter went to school. my son is in the police department and my daughter works in the tech industry. my wife and i are very proud of both of them. i served on my homeowners association as delegate to the western twin p
're a statewide education civil rights organization, i was in san diego unified school district. so, you could see the budget cuts year and year rippling through our schools and our classrooms. and so, what's really at stake when we think about the future is not just our education system, not just our k-12 system, but the economy of our state and our state's future. what proposition 38 does is it reinvests in our k-12 system, our preschool system, for 12 years. on an average, $10 billion a year, and that would actually restore all the cuts that have been slashing through our education system for the last five years. now, that money is protected. it can't be taken by sacramento, it can't be used for other purposes. it has to go to schools. and then it gives films at the school level the ability to make decisions about how to use that money. so, not folks in sacramento, not administrators in districts but folks at the school level. and that's $10 billion a year that can be used to restore arts, music, p.e., extend the school year, all of the things that have been cut from our schools and school dist
boys then libertarians blew up his campaign when he gave the libertarian answer on the 1964 civil rights act. suddenly he was tendering on that, john stossel. john: let's play some clips. romney says he will repeal obamacare. but he wants to keep the popular parts. >> number one, pre-existing conditions are covered under my plan. john: that's popular. no one likes the idea that pre-existing conditions are covere but that is not insurance, that is elfare. >> this is what our entire segment should beyond. of simply blowing off your obsession with drug legalization. health care. if we did not repeal obamacar in the next few years john: repeal it but tepee expensive parts. cover the kids. >> 1,000 years of darkness. th is why you have to vote, i don't care if it's mickey mouse. or big bird. [laughter] but romney is far more free market than any recent republican candidates, including george ush. what romney is talking about here is the free-market. and as you say, pre-existing conditions are popular, like big bird. john: if everybody has to cover pre-existing conditions. >> let me fin
right on par with civil rights of the 1960's. let's end the drug wars. legalize marijuana now. [applause] let's repeal the patriot act. [cheers and applause] i would have never signed the national defense authorization act allowing for you and i as u.s. citizens to be arrested and detained without being charged. that's the reason we fought wars in this country. [cheers and applause] i promise to submit a balanced budget to congress in the year 2013. that is a 1.4 trillion reduction in federal spending. if we don't do this now, we are going to find ourselves in a monetary collapse and a monetary collapse very simply is when the dollars we have in our pockets don't buy a thing because of the acome anying inflation -- because of the accompanying inflation that goes along with every dollar we spend. thathe only candidate wants to eliminate income tax, eliminate corporate tax, abolish the i.r.s. and replace all of that with one federal consumption tax, the fair tax. i think it is the answer to our exports, it is the answer to american jobs. [applause] >> in what way way does the war on drugs
unman e drones however some civil rights have privacy issueshey're hoping this small aircraft could help with other law-enforcement agencies. >> for a search and rescue, squad, fire arms, rural areas. not easily accessible by a patrol car those types of situations. it could be a tremendous search help. >> the advantage is attractive. about a low amount of fuel on a helicopter. $1500 per helicopter. the shares to it is attractive. >> to lower the amount of fuel in a helicopter which is $1,500 per hour for a helicopter however, these are only $2,200 per month to park and has avoided the unmanned aircraft and privacy concerns that arise. >> when they think of a drone... drones that fly over pakistan. or a-grown but this is a quad helicopter. the about privacy concerns are always a concern for us. we have that robots and that and on the bomb squad and in the worst bomb squads for remote control. we do not roll closed down the road this is mission however specific. if we have a person that is fired off a gun and we can deploy this and nothing that the public would have a problem with that. o
. rosa parks took the upper seat in montgomery, alabama. it did not create the civil- rights movement. it was a courageous act, but public opinion had changed before that. and the reason we know that public opinion change first is because rosa parks did the same thing 12 years earlier and nothing happened. in between, african-american soldiers came back from world war ii, southerners came back north with a different set of views, but jackie robinson began to play major-league baseball. the political process caught up later and it took a catalyst to spark the change. right now we are in one of those moments where public opinion is ahead of the political leadership. >> importantly, what rick says about people walking into thoughts and ideologies is true, but on the other hand every poll shows that people want our elected officials to compromise and get things done. that is the message. >> i am accompanying ed miller, from texas. karl rove is single-handedly responsible for turning my mother into an armchair pollster. every other day she calls up and says -- french, obama is up by three.
with civil rights. grant was the last of the lincoln republicans. one point i make is grant was the last president, the only president between abraham lincoln and lyndon johnson who took civil-rights for african-americans seriously. after grant left office the former slaves were left to the tender mercies of the majority of the south and quickly they were shoved to the side. >> don't ask the question if you don't want bill to answer it thoroughly. >> i do accept yes and no, multiple choice questions. >> we only have three minutes and there's a serious deadline so a brief question. >> you said you want to write history or biography. when i read your benjamin franklin biography you sound like a particle american, the first to the modern in some sense. very different people speaking. , who is the first american in the sense that he or she has attitudes like we do and writing biographies and things like that between 1620, and 1770. >> i am not sure i understand the question. who is the first american? >> who would you think after early colonization would have american attitudes that we recog
's political activities from a fairly young age. >> narrator: his dad thought civil rights were worth fighting for. as a teenager, mitt was less interested in the issues than being with his dad. >> the word from his family is that he was not necessarily interested in politics as ideology. but there was always something about his father and his father's power and his father's profession that kept him around and kept him close in a way that it didn't do that for other members of his family. (newsreel music plays) >> the eyes of the nation are on san francisco as the republican party convenes to nominate its choice for president. >> narrator: and in 1964, mitt traveled with his dad to watch him take on conservative republican senator barry goldwater. >> the republican party should unequivocally repudiate extremists of the right and the left, and reject their efforts to infiltrate or attach themselves to our party or its candidates. >> mitt is absorbing all of this. he sees his father basically taking a stand and admires his father greatly for this. >> narrator: but it was barry goldwater's conven
of the area of impact? >> right now we're counting on our law enforcement officials and civil defense to enact the evacuation. people are evacuating. roads are somewhat congested but we're hoping people continue to cooperate with our law enforcement officials. >> those roads that are congested, are they a safe distance from the beach that people of trying to get out right now if. >> they're our main thoroughfares. we didn't have as much lead time as we have had in previous tsunami warnings. they're under the cover of night. so they may have slowed down evacuation somewhat. >> could you be in a situation where this tsunami less than 30 minutes away could come onshore and there are still significant cars on the road? >> we are hoping that the word has gotten out enough that folks closest to the roads, closest to the evacuation zones, are already out of the evacuation zones. if not, we're counting on our law enforcement officials and local self-defense -- >> the problem is some people that didn't need to evacuate are evacuating. so perhaps you're seeing more people on the roads trying to get to h
the first railroads were build in new york state, the first rail line was laid right parallel to the canal, and later, the first interstate west through new york was laid right next to the railroad, and it was not until really after the civil war that the amount of freight carried by railroads exceeded the amount of freight carried by the erie canal and other canals. >> i've got a follow-up question to that actually, you know, are there any bits of the erie canal operational today for commerce rather than historical republicans? >> right. , i think i mentioned this is the third version. the first was four feet deep, enlargement from the 1830s to the 60s, and then from 1905-1917, the current canal built, a canal for motorized barges. the current canal is essentially much straighter, much, much broader than the original canal, and there is -- i've basketball on the canal, and there's now -- i've been on the canal, and there's not for several decades, no commercial activity. it's entirely pleasure boaters, and there was a brief resurgence in the summer when gas went up to -- when oil prices s
on the civil side and used to apply under the a.l.i. test and now we have a new distribution of being able to distinguish right from wrong. so now we have two completely different distributions that we're drawing that bright line on. >> competent versus volitional. we can decide that cognitive isn't sufficient, but it is the basis where we draw the line. sorry. >> ok. so to get back to the science, do you see how the research that you're doing and this imaging and identification of areas in the brain that may be part of primarily psychopathy which we're talking about today, how would that be used in the courtroom? what is your opinion? >> classically individuals who have those trades, the lack of empathy, those traits predict future recidivism. if you're an offender and scored very high on those traits, you have a four to eight times increased risk of reoffending when released if you're an inmate. it is an construct on a future dangerness issue and used in risk assessment. the literature has done, it has helped us to understand that there are, that since the brains are very different, they
civil commitment. >> professor. >> i'm going to add, do this a little bit shorter, i think, which is let's start with a question to everybody in the audience. all right, so if you like chocolate cake, raise your left hand. if you do not like chocolate cake, raise your right hand. all people who like chocolate cake left hand, don't like chocolate cake right hand. all right, hands down. how many people found it difficult to raise your hand by yourself? not very many. great, you made a choice. you thought about it. you decided and you acted. and my concept of what free will is the ability to act consistent with your preferences and desires. just that simple. now how many people here feel like you have control over whether or not you like chocolate cake? raise either hands. fewer, right. so there are two different things going on that we often conflate when we talk about free will. one is your predispositions to preferences and desires, ok. that may be impulsivity, that may be violence, that may be anti-social personality disorder, that may be a preference for chocolate cake, a preference fo
story we're watching very closely right now. a massive earthquake off the west coast, triggering a tsunami for hawaii. our affiliate in hawaii reports. >> reporter: very serious situation in hawaii. earlier this morning, the civil servicish shug an evacuation. they are seeing some of those tsunami waves come in. still fairly serious situation out here with what may happen in the bays. still going to be a long night tonight. at least a couple of more hours before they consider lowering that advisory. we'll send it back to youm. >> thank you, lara. >>> back out to sam, walk me through the science here, how long could they be on alert in hawaii? >> dan, first of all, as soon as that earthquake happened, knowing that it's 7.7, they did all of the right things. they put the warnings out, thinking that may this would be a bad run of waves. evacuating those lower levels of hawaii were a very good idea. so, you e initially think that first wave would run away from that, remember, this is a subsiding zone, one plate is underneath another plate. a little wave or two and one or two, three,
together. i've come forward within my party to say that i believe that civil unions should be acceptable. we want to make sure they have these rights. i do believe marriage is between a man a woman. >> this create two classes of people. >> congressman dold, do you think you are reflected in your district. >> it is moderate. it's more fiscally conservative and socially moderate. >> i know the major of my district supports marriage equality. i know major of my district. mr.dold opposes that. >> the question from the chat, like presidential candidates mitt romney you have refused to release your tax returns. why is that. congressman dold, you believe that governor romney should release his turns? >> everything voters want to know about my financial position, what i've earned and owned and stock, bob and even our kids saving accounts are included on the report. what i said is my wife has her own career. she is a professional and she has competitors. she's not running for congress. my wife has a right to certain degree of privacy. >> your wife maybe entitled from privacy and but they've enti
the civil war. >> you're rolling your eyes, george. >> am i wrong? >> you are and i'll say why. democrats have been losing the white vote constantly since 1964. >> john kerry lost the white vote. >> that's right. 20008, from obama, gets that many white votes. we're trying to explain this difference. now, two possible explanations lot of white people who voted for obama in 2008 watched him govern for four years and said, not so good, let's try someone else. the con fedry theory, in the last four years, became racist. >> that's not my argument at all, george. >> it sounds like it. >> no. i'm pointing out the fact that the white voters changing their minds happen to be in virginia and florida. only two states in the -- let me point out -- southernization of the republican party. they were the only two states in 2008 that violated the rule. >> a statement that's checkable and false. that people -- white people moving away are in those two states. >> and a loft them were republicans. >> look, one more time, this could be ohio, that's where president obama is focusing on, the white male vote in
to the civil rights act. >> this conversation is taking a nasty turn since i found out i got my tac -- facts wrong. [laughter] >> you know, you got so many other facts right in your book, i don't think you need to worry. i would like you each to talk a little bit, starting with you, marc, about the different facets and aspects of the personalities to which you were privy, in particular in your case lbj and some of the dynamics and contradictions in lbj is personality as reflected by the many voices that you have included in this book. >> well, i'm looking at in the audience. many technology to people, one of whom is harry middleton. terry was the first director of the lbj library, my predecessor, my dear friend, and so much of the scholarship about ladybird johnson comes from the work that harry did in the lbj library. the other one sitting next to him is surely a chance to work for mrs. johnson for many years into recently prevailed with the united states post office in getting a postage stamp in honors of ladybird johnson. [applause] a friend of mine and harry's ensure lease was a speechwr
Search Results 0 to 33 of about 34 (some duplicates have been removed)